New Perspective

I was lucky enough to receive this book for my birthday, a very good choice by my husband, it turns out – I hadn’t even heard of it. ‘A Bigger Message – Conversations with David Hockney’ has received great reviews since its publication some years ago. (Just take a look at the Amazon reviews and goodreads)

I found it very accessible and, contrary to my usual greedy, gobbling approach, I paced myself so that I actually stood a chance of digesting some of the ideas Hockney explores. Bitesize chunks, with time to consider in between.

A Bigger Message: Conversations with David Hockney

The book takes the form of a wide-ranging dialogue between the author and Hockney, giving an insight into the mind of the artist, his approach to art and his constant quest to represent the world and imagination. The dialogue roams widely, from comparing the use of different types of perspective (I’d never considered there could be more than one) and the limitations of photography, to how the iPad is changing art. There are plenty of pictures too!

I found the ideas gave me a new perspective (haha), and Hockney himself seems very engaging and a real ‘live wire.’ It was revealing also to hear the back story behind some of his pictures, which helped me to make sense of his progression in art and how he’s arrived at the style he has today.

I know that I will come back to this book, and I’ll be lending it to friends with an interest in art. If you get a chance to borrow a copy, I’d say ‘Yes,’ find a comfy chair and take the phone off the hook…

Popup Wonders

Image result for sabuda and reinhartI adore pop-up books. It’s the ingenuity of the designers which intrigues me the most – the ability to produce the 3D model from 2 dimensions.

I’m lucky enough to have a very small collection of modern pop-ups, mostly by master ‘paper engineer’ illustrators, Sabuda and Reinhart. They are known for their triumphs with dinosaurs and castles, and they have also illustrated storybooks, including The Wizard of Oz, complete with hot air balloon.  It seems they can bring any subject to life, springing from the page. I treasure these books, and hope that they will survive down the generations, until their glue and wonderful folds give up…

If you’re interested in finding out more, there’s an interesting interview here in which Sabuda and Reinhart discuss their process, and a clip of them talking about their work:

▶ Cover Story – Robert Sabuda & Matthew Reinhart – YouTube.

Now, anyone feel up to having a go?